Accommodating people with physical disabilities

28 Feb

According to HR Daily Advisor, these are some of the common issues associated with hiring and managing employees with disabilities under the ADA: So to clear up the misconceptions about relations and expectations between employers and employees with disabilities, let’s take a closer look at the rights, safety precautions, and resources that enable everyone to efficiently do their jobs. are largely governed by the ADA, and several government entities are entrusted to ensure the act’s protections extend to the appropriate parties.The ultimate goal of the ADA is to break down societal barriers and give all Americans equal rights regardless of disabilities, much in the way that equal rights are extended to individuals regardless of race, religion, gender, age, and national origin. Since 1994, employers with 15 or more employees have been subject to ADA requirements, including private companies, state and local governments, labor unions, and employment agencies.

A disability can also be visible (for example, a wheelchair or white cane indicates the person has a disability) or invisible (for example, a mental illness).The duty to accommodate is most often applied in situations involving persons with physical or mental disability but it also applies to all other grounds covered by the Canadian Human Rights Act, for example: Please note: Different jurisdictions may have different interpretations about the duty to accommodate.It is important to check with your provincial/territorial Human Rights Commission.First of all, there are no ADA inspectors who make random visits to see whether facilities are accessible, although some state agencies may do that for entities they fund or oversee.Thus, in most cases, ADA standards aren’t brought into play until someone challenges a business, agency, or institution in the courts.