Dating bottles by their tops and bases

09 Jul

A close inspection of the label which only notes "H. of the company name (due to label damage) and a check of a food bottle reference (Zumwalt 1980) indicates that this jar was used by the H. which was a pioneer San Francisco wholesale grocer beginning in the 1850s.

Further use of the internet indicated the company was in business until at least the early 1900s and were selling mincemeat for 6 cents per pound in 1900 ( - on Google Books).

As well as meeting customer demand, the move to low-impact interiors reflects hoteliers’ desire to cut operating costs, create healthy and productive places to stay and work, and pass rigorous standards in order to achieve accreditation from one of the internationally recognised “green” building certification schemes, such as BREEAM (the Building Research Establishment Environmental Assessment Method) or the US Building Council’s LEED (Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design).

This represents the main "yoke and cam lever" competition for the more common canning jars which utilized a different version of the cam lever tightening yoke/lid closure conformation.

This particular jar is even rarer in that it has about 95% of the original labeling indicating it was used by a San Francisco, CA. Although regular fruit jars were often used by packing companies to bottle their products - a great marketing ploy - it is a very rare occurrence that a jar is found with the original label since the purchaser of the jar would use it for their own home canning and the labels come off in the water bath during canning. from about 1894 to 1903 by an unknown glass house (Roller 2011).

“The resulting effects can be highly visible and undermine the environmental quality of the destination.” The good news is that the choice of good quality, stylish and low-impact products is greater than ever, with everything from 100% recycled glass tiles and counter tops to hemp rugs and organic carpet tiles, vinyl-free Forest Stewardship Council (FSC)-certified ground-paper-pulp wallpaper, designer stools made from scrap metal and lamps created out of salvaged timber.

AS WELL AS MEETING CUSTOMER DEMAND, THE MOVE TO LOW-IMPACT INTERIORS REFLECTS HOTELIERS’ DESIRE TO CUT OPERATING COSTS, CREATE HEALTHY PRODUCTIVE PLACES TO STAY AND WORK AND PASS RIGOROUS STANDARDS IN ORDER TO ACHIEVE ACCREDITATION A new service will assist hoteliers along the way to sustainability in their interior design.